Snickerdoodle Cupcakes

Snickerdoodle Cupcakes
These were delicious.  They were light and moist with a nice cinnamon flavor.  I’m generally not a fan of snickerdoodle cookies, they are usually too bland for me.   These cupcakes are far superior to their cookie cousins.  I do prefer most things in cupcake form.

The frosting is a seven minute frosting.  It is similar to  a marshmallow but with a fluffier texture, contains no gelatin and is very pipe-able.  It does need to be eaten within about a day or it starts to soften and lose structure.  I’ve made this with a hand mixer, but it is much, much easier with a stand mixer so that the eggs can be whipped hands-free and the boiling hot and dangerous syrup can be controlled with two hands.

I had some leftover frosting and thought I would add it to hot chocolate, since it reminded me of marshmallows.  I think this was the worst idea I had in a long time.  It was disgusting in hot chocolate.  It didn’t melt, but the sugar dissolved and then the remaining egg parts cooked into little egg bits.  Yuck!  Don’t ever try it.  In hindsight, it is obvious that it was a bad idea.  I’m always careful when I temper eggs in custards so they don’t cook, why would I think to do this?

Snickerdoodle Cupcakes

adapted from Martha Stewart’s Cupcakes

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 1/2 cups cake flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon ground cinnamon, plus 1/2 teaspoon for dusting
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
1 3/4 cups sugar, plus 2 tablespoons for dusting
4 large eggs, room temperature
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
1 1/4 cups milk

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line standard muffin tins with paper liners. Sift together both flours, baking powder, salt, and 1 tablespoon cinnamon.
With an electric mixer on medium-high speed, cream butter and sugar until pale and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, beating until each is incorporated, scraping down sides of bowl as needed. Beat in vanilla. Reduce speed to low. Add flour mixture in three batches, alternating with two additions of milk, and beating until combined after each.
Divide batter evenly among lined cups, filling each three-quarters full. Bake, rotating tins halfway through, until a cake tester inserted in centers comes out clean, about 20 minutes. Transfer tins to wire racks to cool completely before removing cupcakes. Cupcakes can be stored up to 2 days at room temperature, or frozen up to 2 months, in airtight containers.
To finish, combine remaining 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon and 2 tablespoons sugar. Using a pastry bag fitted with a large plain tip (Ateco No. 809 or Wilton No. 1A), pipe frosting on each cupcake: Hold bag over cupcake with tip just above top, and squeeze to create a dome of frosting, then release pressure and pull up to form a peak. Using a small, fine sieve, dust peaks with cinnamon-sugar. Cupcakes are best eaten the day they are frosted; keep at room temperature until ready to serve.

Seven Minute Frosting

adapted from Martha Stewart’s Cupcakes

1 1/2 cups plus 2 tablespoons sugar
2/3 cup water
2 tablespoons light corn syrup
6 large egg whites, room temperature
Combine 1 1/2 cups sugar with the water and corn syrup in a small saucepan; clip a candy thermometer to side of pan. Bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until sugar dissolves. Continue boiling, without stirring, until syrup reaches 230 degrees.
Meanwhile, in the bowl of a standing electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, whisk egg whites on medium-high speed until soft peaks form. With mixer running, add remaining 2 tablespoons sugar, beating to combine.
As soon as sugar syrup reaches 230 degrees, remove from heat. With mixer on medium-low speed, pour syrup down side of bowl in a slow, steady stream. Raise speed to medium-high; whisk until mixture is completely cool (test by touching the bottom of the bowl) and stiff (but not dry) peaks form, about 7 minutes. Use immediately.

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